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Posted on Jul 25, 2013

How Twitter Reacted to Ahmad Al Assir

How Twitter Reacted to Ahmad Al Assir

Following the latest events in Sidon and the clashes in Abra, Twitter resounded with hashtags and support for all kinds of parties, be it the Army, Assir, Fadel Chaker, or any other political faction. The global repercussions were evident in the hike in Lebanon keywords and hashtags, as world news agencies reported the notorious instability that smeared the Southern coast.

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Posted on Jun 28, 2013

Why Every Lebanese Household Needs to Play SimCity

Why Every Lebanese Household Needs to Play SimCity

I grew up with SimCity, and many aspects of the game grew up with me and shaped the way I perceive societies. It was always just a game until I started gathering points here and there during my travel experiences. I’ll come back to that later on.

First of all, let me start by stating that I am not endorsing the game nor I am affiliated with in any manner. My enthusiasm for Simcity stems to my early childhood when SimCity 2000 was a revolutionary game in the mid 90s.

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Posted on Feb 13, 2013

Civil Marriage In Lebanon [بالعربي Infographic]

Civil Marriage In Lebanon [بالعربي Infographic]

The recent turmoil regarding the civil marriage has affected the lives of all lebanese citizens and politicians alike. Shackled between tradition and the needs of modern society, the notion of allowing civil marriage in lebanon will forever morph the nation into what many hope to be a beginning to the end of sectarian conflicts in the country. Many favoring traditional marriage prefer to do so on the basis of the preservation of the family and its values, knowing that divorce is usually much easier to deal with and therefore paving the way for a society different than what previous generations were brought upon. The topic is still under debate where religious figures struggle to maintain their domination on this sacred bond, leaving the public in an indecisive state yet again.

This infographic attempts to tackle the issue from its birth in 1936 to the latest updates through statistics, quotations, polls, and experiences gathered over the course of time. I hope you like it, and please spread the word. Thanks!

 

Civil Marriage In Lebanon [بالعربي Infographic]

Civil Marriage In Lebanon [بالعربي Infographic]

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Posted on Oct 5, 2012

Lebanese Politicians and Their Salaries [Infographic بالعربي ]

Lebanese Politicians and Their Salaries [Infographic بالعربي ]

Politicians Salaries ArabicI translated this infographic to Arabic as a special request. The English version can be found here: http://nicolashayek.me/lebanese-politicians-salaries/

Enjoy!

 

 

 

رواتب الرؤساء والنواب اللبنانيين

“رواتب الرؤساء والنواب اللبنانيين”

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Posted on Sep 29, 2012

Lebanese Politicians and their Salaries [Infographic]

Lebanese Politicians and their Salaries [Infographic]

I was inspired by a recent article discussing the notion of increasing salaries of the current government and the national outcry that propagated because of it. Whether the law was given the green light or discarded, the fact remains that our government bears no consideration to the needs of its people. Sadly, the absence of the middle class and the majority of the population is below the poverty line. It’s only time that will decide how long the people will remain under economic gridlock, but hey, at least their politicians are doing fine.

Update: Due to ongoing requests, an Arabic version was created on this page: http://nicolashayek.me/lebanese-politicians-salaries-infographic-arabic/

Lebanese Politicians and Their Salaries

‘Lebanese Politicians and Their Salaries’

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Posted on Sep 6, 2012

Lebanon Falls 2 Places in Global Competitiveness Ranking

Lebanon Falls 2 Places in Global Competitiveness Ranking

Source: Wikipedia.org

A couple of months ago, I ran across several articles that preached good news about Beirut being the competitive capital that is slowly becoming a cluster for incubators and startups. A recent google query failed to date me anywhere closer to 2010, with bad news on the doors.

For another year, Lebanon drops 2 ranks in the Global Competitiveness Index 2012-2013, anchoring at 91, down from 89 in 2011-2012 rankings, with no good news for the coming year in light of the political instability. Being above Greece and Argentina is something to boast about, but then all countries like Azerbaijan and Gabon score higher on that list. It shouldn’t be the direct index for a country’s success, but competitiveness plays on the long-term prosperity of the country and the efficiency of its people, and it’s not looking bright for us Lebanese.

It is sad to find that the private and public sectors are still two realms far away from each other like heaven and hell. The private sector is well developed and hindered by foreign investment and infrastructure, factors that are both a responsibility of any government. We’re bound to find out till when the Lebanese will be able to untie the knot that’s suffocating its progression and live to see a brighter future to its future generations. It’ll happen, though. I’m sure of it.

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Nicolas El Hayek located at Beirut, Lebanon , Beirut, LB . Reviewed by rated: 4.5 / 5